Kiss the Sky

Composite of Sierra Nevada mountains in California with New Mexico morning sky.

“Ghost” image of the Sierra Nevada mountains to the west combined with morning sky taken in New Mexico headed east.

 

Dramatic dark sky taken in June in Duncans, Trelawny, Jamaica - W.I.

Rain threatens the Jamaican coast in June creating a dramatic dark sky.

Unforgettable clouds create a painterly image of the Florida sky

Beautiful clouds above the Atlantic Ocean taken on a July summer’s day from a Jupiter Island home.

A perfect Florida sky reflects in the still waters of the Indian River amid the mangroves

A peaceful scene taken from the red bridge on Harbour Island, a private garden sanctuary on Jupiter Island, Florida.

Driving through North Dakota heavy fog dissipates as the sun pierces through the mist

A strange image of the sun reflecting through the fog in North Dakota – early morning.

“The sky and the strong wind have moved the spirit inside me till I am carried away trembling with joy.”

This quote is attributed to Uvanuk, a female (shaman) of the Greenland Inuit. It is thought that Knud Rasmussen the Danish polar explorer and anthropologist, captured her thoughts in the early 20th century. The legend of Uvanuk is that she went outside her dwelling to urinate and a ball of fire (maybe a meteorite) fell from the sky and hit her. When she revived her consciousness she began spontaneously chanting a poem:

The great sea moves me, the great sea sets me adrift! It moves me like algae on stones in running brook water. The vault of heaven moves me! The mighty weather storms through my soul. It tears me with it. And I tremble with joy.”

Whenever she chanted this song Uvanuk was said to have psychic powers and could tell the misdeeds of people in her presence. (From the book Mystical Experiences: Wisdom in Unexpected Places from Prisons to Main Street by Jack Farrell).

Under the great sky even the mundane can become magnificent. One can only imagine Uvanuk’s experience of the sky in a vast wilderness of ice and snow. There the sky and horizon become one. My experience of the sky is more as a constant companion with a changing temperament.

When driving I’ve come to anticipate the dawn and dusk and the changing colors so filled with light and subtle energy. The morning sky is especially welcome after a night of darkness when I must fight sleep. But always the intensity of colors and light is a gift for the eyes and the spirit.  In the United States, to the east and to the west as the sun rises and sets, the light changes by the minute and one learns to savor the quick moments the sky takes on personality at once calm and bright and then menacing and unforgiving.

Dark clouds become heaven’s flowers when kissed by light” said the poet, Rabindranath Tagore. Storm clouds and the sudden darkness of a summer’s day is welcome in Florida where rains come like blizzards in the summer. Those of us who live in the tropics like Jamaica or Florida know the summer brings the rain and sometimes lightning too – a dangerous combination. The purity of the air after these rains is to be remembered always.

The spring sky is filled with the movement of birds migrating north. Too long they have been away. They come with sudden, unexpected bursts into view and then are gone. What does it mean to “kiss the sky” like Jimi Hendrix said? Embrace the sky, taste the sky, study the sky, glad it’s blue, red and velvet. We haven’t even talked about the night sky. Another time…

Waves of Snow on Interstate 80 in Wyoming

Driving across Interstate 80 at daybreak in Wyoming high winds rip across the road. Snow blows in ripples beautiful but scary powerful. Coming first from the southeast and then from the northwest, the wind blows. The waves of snow come like trails of a woman’s long hair. The big bright moon shines upon the wild world.  A moon at daybreak is always a special sight.

The scene is surreal.  I am taking the video as my colleague, Helena drives. We are both quiet and reverent, respectful of this force of nature. Wyoming is known for the dangerous winds and many times the speed limits is only 35 mph on an road that is usually 75 mph for cars.

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The Language of Trees

“Trees are the earth’s endless effort to speak to the listening heaven,” said Rabindranath Tagore.

“God is the experience of looking at a tree and saying ‘Ah’…” Joseph Campbell.

Travel necessitates the experience of being encased in metal and steel: cars, planes and for me, eighteen wheeler tractor trucks towing trailers across America. Instead of walking barefoot in the sand of Florida’s or Jamaica’s beaches where I have homes, I find myself in dirty parking lots stained with oil and usually strewn with trash. My heart yearns for the natural places I love. It’s no wonder the images I most enjoy creating are of trees, nature, ocean and sky.

Lately I’ve been thinking about aging yet know we are immortal beings having a human experience. As a 21st century woman it is slight comfort, we who have been brainwashed to value our worth on youth and looks. The battle of the ego over true self is the task of life and I’m a dedicated warrior.

In the truck I listen to audio books and music as I drive.  I get most of the books from LibriVox an organization that provides audio books that are in the public domain.The books are free and have been recorded by volunteers.  I’ve been listening to Hans Christian Andersen, a favorite author known for his fairy tales and highly revered in his home country of Denmark; most people are unaware that he was a accomplished traveler. Wikipedia says “Andersen took heed of some of the contemporary conventions about travel writing, but always developed the genre to suit his own purposes. Each of his travelogues combines documentary and descriptive accounts of the sights he saw with more philosophical passages on topics such as being an author, immortality, and the nature of fiction in the literary travel report.”

Andersen’s stories are mythical fables woven with magic, tenderness and a universal view of humanity. He conveys a mystical understanding of the depths of human kindness and benevolence contrasted with our demon nature when we are overtaken with greed and striving.

As I planned to write this post I knew I wanted to share images of trees and I remembered the story by Hans Christian Andersen called “The Old Oak Tree’s Last Dream.” It is the story of a grand oak tree that finally “dies” in a winter storm being torn up by the wind. Before this, the tree has a magnificent dream, reminiscent of a stellar acid trip or cosmic moment when the one is united with the many and the universe is perceived as a speck of dust and all eternity united as one.  One part of the story is an interchange between him and a “May fly” – Ephemora, a species of fly which lives for only one day. They speak about the relativity of their life spans – the tree, “thousands of seasons and the fly, thousands of moments.

These musings prompt me to encourage each of you who has taken the time to read this post to give thanks for this moment and plant trees whenever you are able.

Stunning poinciana trees in bloom are enjoyed throughout Jamaica. This beautiful specimen graces the road to the pristine public beach in Duncans, Jamaica.

A stately Poinciana in bloom overlooks the road to the beach in Duncans, Jamaica. It is always a welcoming sight for both locals and tourists.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This artistic expression of young trees in Oregon depicts their "bones" in the dead of winter.

A group of young trees taken in winter from the highway in Oregon.

 

 

 

 

 

A birch tree amid fall colors in Sundance, Utah.

Fall colors at Sundance in Utah.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Taken in the neighborhood of Spicy Hill - Duncans, Jamaica the Tamarind tree has a sour fruit.

Tamarind tree at dusk in Duncans, Jamaica.

Ideas & Obsessions

Experimental portrait. Photographer in the pool. It was too cold for the model.

Experimental portrait. Photographer in the pool. It was too cold for the model.

An orange maple leaf floating in a pool of green water lit from below

An orange maple leaf floating in a hot tub at night.

A young woman in a pink bathing suit floating in a clear pool. She's about 9.

Brandi floating in pool Duncans, Jamaica

Blue, almost purple lights reflecting in green water

A photo of Christmas lights reflecting in the water.

I’ve been obsessed for years about the idea of taking portraits of women in the water. I wanted to call them “Ophelia Portraits” after Hamlet’s lover who drowned from her madness. Pictured in many paintings and other images she usually has flowers strewn in the water and long, hair – a vacuous look on her face. I had also seen a portrait I liked of a male celebrity and he was standing fully dressed in a soaked shirt and tie. I liked the look.

Now that I’m a fan of Pintrest, I find hundreds of beautiful, haunting photos of water. Sometimes people are there and often they are not. Submerged or just wet, eyes closed looking like they are dreaming – dressed or naked I gravitate to the images.

The portrait of me in the pool was my first attempt. My model was too cold to get wet; it was December in Southern California but still very chilly though the pool was heated. I asked her to work with me because she was tall, blonde, had a lovely face and I also thought she would make a good photographer. My friend said this image reminds her of a crime scene and I agree mostly because of the look on my face. When I showed it to people on my iPhone they always turned it vertically and then it looked even more strange. This was the only image I thought worked at any level and mostly because I liked the curve of the arm. I worked hard to get the arm curve and it wasn’t easy thrashing around in the water trying to float and move with elegance at the same time.

I always feel vulnerable about sharing images especially when I compare myself to the other photographers and the images on Pintrest. This I find is a character defect. Usually though I listen to the image and it tells me to share. Brandi is a favorite model besides Fureus in Jamaica and this was taken when she was only nine. I also have another photo of her ‘doe eyed’ face on the home page of my publishing and consulting site. The leaf and water images were also taken in California during the winter.

I like the colors and patterns in the water. It’s like fog and smoke those things we can’t control or predict.

From “White Collar” to “Blue Collar.” How I found “The Weekend” or Getting a CDL in California

The image shows a blue sky, mountains, a layer of fog and a golden field. On the left one can see a highway extending forward.

Layer of fog in the early morning traveling east from California toward Salt Lake City, Utah

In September I entered a training program with CR England to get a CDL (Commercial Drivers License) in California. It was a fast and furious immersion into a new skill. I got a permit within a week and within another two weeks had learned how to operate a semi tractor to pull containers/trailers and had taken the exam by a California certified DMV (Department of Motor Vehicles) examiner. The CR England program entails entering two phases of training culminating in driving 30,000 miles and staying on a truck for about 2 months straight. In December I graduated their program and now I’m working on the Relief & Recovery Fleet – finding my way and gaining experience and confidence. The program was not easy, it was one of the most difficult things I’ve ever done in my life…definitely out of my comfort zone.

My first trainer, Laura, is only 24 years old but a consummate professional with a great work ethic. Compassionate and funny she was a blessing. As a lover of music she introduced me to “The Weekend” aka Abel Tesfaye, a Canadian recording artists and record producer. He’s really hot right now and is often categorized as alternative R&B. His voice has been compared to Michael Jackson.

Learning about music is important to me as I market “Island Voices Reggae & New Jamaican Music,” written by Fureus and I. I’m grateful to have the opportunity to get a CDL – finding a corporate position has eluded me since being downsized by AT&T Wireless several years ago and making stable income with my consulting company, art gallery and other efforts has not been successful. Trucking for some reason is the door that continues to open now and I’m embracing it.

It has been a surreal transition going from a “white collar” corporate person to a “blue collar” worker. I have considerable investment in my education and spent the last several years gaining more technology skills, teaching certifications, etc. Those efforts were for naught in terms of employment but looking at the big picture – all good in terms of my interests and goals. My maternal grandfather was a teamster and I come from good solid people – father and brothers in the auto body business though my Dad was the mayor of our hometown, Leominster, MA. I was the first in my family to have the privilege of a college education, with my mother following quickly after (she graduated at the top of her class – I did not). As “smashing the ego” is a good thing all the way around, I welcome being on the open road instead of in a cubicle but as with all professions there are good and bad aspects. One feature of trucking that I love is my exposure to America – new vistas everyday and the ability to make images along the way and interact with a multitude of people. Some of them look sad at the truck stops but I think they are mostly tired and I am of the philosophy that a smile is a free gift I can give to all. I have decided this journey is in alignment with my publishing goals to create and market electronic and audio books about travel and tourism. In my blog and social media sites I’ll be sharing photos and reflections along the way.

This image taken on the truck with Laura is the early morning fog as we traveled through Utah on the way to Salt Lake City.

Reinvention So Cal Style

I moved to California four weeks ago. I travel between here, Jamaica and Florida. I’m lucky to have homes in both Duncans, Jamaica and Hobe Sound, Florida. Here in So Cal, I have an opportunity to spend time with my family and “reinvent myself” while marketing my new e-book/digital music guide, written with Fureus, “Island Voices Reggae and New Jamaican Music.” I’m creating this site and blog to feature my portfolios and enable me to link to Pinterest and other social media in an integrated fashion independent of my consulting and publishing site, Universal Eye Media.  I’ll be writing about the adventure of marketing the book and sharing information for authors. As a devotee of digital publishing, I’m building documents for the iPad and tablets that are really individual apps for people – articles or magazines that are personalized and specific. The pundits have talked a long time about “media convergence” but now it is truly happening as we can create apps and documents that combine video, websites, photography and writing into elegant and beautiful documents that are pieces of art. I’ll be helping writers, artists, musicians and business people to forward their individual and personal goals with new media. I’m connecting with lots of eclectic and electric people. Truly, the vibe and geography is different than the east coast. I’m told the energy is conducive to innovation and open communication. So far it feels that way.

Abstract Image Blue Light Curving

Blue Light Sculpture Pechanga Casino