From “White Collar” to “Blue Collar.” How I found “The Weekend” or Getting a CDL in California

The image shows a blue sky, mountains, a layer of fog and a golden field. On the left one can see a highway extending forward.

Layer of fog in the early morning traveling east from California toward Salt Lake City, Utah

In September I entered a training program with CR England to get a CDL (Commercial Drivers License) in California. It was a fast and furious immersion into a new skill. I got a permit within a week and within another two weeks had learned how to operate a semi tractor to pull containers/trailers and had taken the exam by a California certified DMV (Department of Motor Vehicles) examiner. The CR England program entails entering two phases of training culminating in driving 30,000 miles and staying on a truck for about 2 months straight. In December I graduated their program and now I’m working on the Relief & Recovery Fleet – finding my way and gaining experience and confidence. The program was not easy, it was one of the most difficult things I’ve ever done in my life…definitely out of my comfort zone.

My first trainer, Laura, is only 24 years old but a consummate professional with a great work ethic. Compassionate and funny she was a blessing. As a lover of music she introduced me to “The Weekend” aka Abel Tesfaye, a Canadian recording artists and record producer. He’s really hot right now and is often categorized as alternative R&B. His voice has been compared to Michael Jackson.

Learning about music is important to me as I market “Island Voices Reggae & New Jamaican Music,” written by Fureus and I. I’m grateful to have the opportunity to get a CDL – finding a corporate position has eluded me since being downsized by AT&T Wireless several years ago and making stable income with my consulting company, art gallery and other efforts has not been successful. Trucking for some reason is the door that continues to open now and I’m embracing it.

It has been a surreal transition going from a “white collar” corporate person to a “blue collar” worker. I have considerable investment in my education and spent the last several years gaining more technology skills, teaching certifications, etc. Those efforts were for naught in terms of employment but looking at the big picture – all good in terms of my interests and goals. My maternal grandfather was a teamster and I come from good solid people – father and brothers in the auto body business though my Dad was the mayor of our hometown, Leominster, MA. I was the first in my family to have the privilege of a college education, with my mother following quickly after (she graduated at the top of her class – I did not). As “smashing the ego” is a good thing all the way around, I welcome being on the open road instead of in a cubicle but as with all professions there are good and bad aspects. One feature of trucking that I love is my exposure to America – new vistas everyday and the ability to make images along the way and interact with a multitude of people. Some of them look sad at the truck stops but I think they are mostly tired and I am of the philosophy that a smile is a free gift I can give to all. I have decided this journey is in alignment with my publishing goals to create and market electronic and audio books about travel and tourism. In my blog and social media sites I’ll be sharing photos and reflections along the way.

This image taken on the truck with Laura is the early morning fog as we traveled through Utah on the way to Salt Lake City.

4 thoughts on “From “White Collar” to “Blue Collar.” How I found “The Weekend” or Getting a CDL in California

  1. Thanks for the encouragement and good luck on your own music production. Hey we are all doing what we love. How cool is that?

  2. One of the things I love about you is your endless capacity for making the best of a situation. I know each opportunity you take expands your potential even further. That’s a blessing to everyone.

  3. That is so awesome Dona. Did not know you were trucking. My dad did that as a third career for years until he really retired around the age of 80. As the saying goes, “Keep on Trucking.” Good luck Dona. Much love. Keep on smiling, too. You never know whose life might be saved by a smile.

  4. Linda, I am amazed how many people have loved ones who are truckers the last of the American cowboy. Yes a smile goes a long way being a nurse you certainly know that! Thanks for reading my blog see you back in Cali!

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